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  • Alveolar osteitis is a relatively common condition that is the result of chronic periodontal disease in cats. It can occur around the upper or the lower canine teeth.

  • Fractured teeth in cats can result from fights, car accidents, and chewing on hard objects. There are five classifications of tooth fractures and each needs treatment to avoid tooth sensitivity and pain. Because cats have thin enamel, even a small chip fracture can cause pain and needs veterinary care. Clinical signs include chewing on one side of the mouth, excessive drooling, pawing at the mouth, and facial swelling.

  • Dogs often break their teeth from chewing on bones, antlers, and hard chew toys. There are five classifications of tooth fractures ranging from enamel fractures to tooth root fractures. Clinical signs can include chewing on one side of the mouth, excessive drooling, dropping food while eating, pawing at the mouth, and facial swelling. A broken tooth needs attention to prevent infection and pain. Your veterinarian may perform root canal or extract the tooth. Eliminating hard chew toys and treats can prevent tooth fractures.

  • Gingival hyperplasia is a term used to describe the abnormal growth of excessive gum tissue. Gingival hyperplasia is caused by an increase in the number of cells within the gums. In chronic or severe cases, inflammation and its secondary effects (mineral or calcium deposition) may be observed. Gingival hyperplasia is most commonly observed in Boxer Dogs. Other predisposed breeds include Bulldogs and, less commonly, Cocker Spaniels.

  • Gingivitis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the gums. Stomatitis may involve the gums, tongue, inner surfaces of the lips, and/or the floor and roof of the mouth. Gingivitis may be caused by a bacterial infection from plaque bacteria on the teeth and is usually associated with poor oral hygiene and can lead to more severe periodontal disease. The cause of stomatitis in dogs is unknown but may be caused by a hyperimmune response of the gum tissues to bacterial biofilm. The first step of treatment is a complete oral health assessment under general anesthesia combined with a thorough cleaning of the teeth. A consistent homecare program will improve your pet’s prognosis for gingivitis. The prognosis for stomatitis is variable depending on the pet.

  • Gingivitis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the gums. Stomatitis may involve the gums, tongue, inner surfaces of the lips, and/or the floor and roof of the mouth. Gingivitis may be caused by a bacterial infection from plaque bacteria on the teeth and is usually associated with poor oral hygiene and can lead to more severe periodontal disease. The cause of stomatitis in dogs is unknown but may be caused by a hyperimmune response of the gum tissues to bacterial biofilm. The first step of treatment is a complete oral health assessment under general anesthesia combined with a thorough cleaning of the teeth. A consistent homecare program will improve your pet’s prognosis for gingivitis. The prognosis for stomatitis is variable depending on the pet.

  • Bad breath (halitosis) is caused by bacteria, plaque, tartar, decomposing food particles, or death of tissue. Treatment of halitosis in cats involves eliminating the cause(s). The teeth need to be thoroughly cleaned and polished under general anesthesia. Teeth affected by advanced periodontal disease or tooth resorption need to be extracted. Reducing the accumulation of plaque, tartar, and resulting halitosis can be achieved by using VOHC accepted products.

  • Halitosis is caused by bacteria, plaque, and tartar. Once halitosis occurs, professional veterinary oral prevention, assessment, and treatment is needed. Teeth affected by advanced periodontal disease need to be extracted. Reducing the accumulation of plaque, tartar, and resulting halitosis can be achieved by using VOHC accepted products.

  • Cats have four types of teeth: incisors, canines, premolars, and molars. There are two types of malocclusion: skeletal and dental. Skeletal malocclusion results when an abnormal jaw length creates a malalignment of the teeth. A dental malocclusion occurs when the upper and lower jaw lengths are considered normal but there may be one or more teeth that are out of normal alignment. Skeletal malocclusions include mandibular distoclusion (Class 2 malocclusion), mandibular mesioclusion (Class 3 malocclusion) and maxillomandibular asymmetry. Dental malocclusions include mesioverted canines and mesiopalatoverted maxillary canines.

  • Dogs have four types of teeth: incisors, canines, premolars and molars. There are two types of malocclusion: skeletal and dental. Skeletal malocclusion results when an abnormal jaw length creates a malalignment of the teeth. A dental malocclusion occurs when the upper and lower jaw lengths are considered normal but there may be one or more teeth that are out of normal alignment. Skeletal malocclusions include mandibular distoclusion (Class 2 malocclusion), mandibular mesioclusion (Class 3 malocclusion) and maxillomandibular asymmetry. Dental malocclusions include rostral crossbite, caudal crossbite, linguoverted mandibular canines, and mesioverted maxillary canines.


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